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September 18, 2013

In Death Valley




12 comments:

  1. Love the photo and the quote! I think I've seen this rock formation before, but can't be sure. I really like the photo.

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  2. Magnificent! Clever choice of quote, very fitting.

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  3. Does this formation have a name? Seems like it would have been known to ancient peoples...imagine the view from there! Wonderful shot!

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  4. The composition could not be better and the contrast of the colors, from the shades of blue to the shades of terra-cotta-red . . . woah! I wish you would post more often.

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  5. Some people don't appreciate the beauty of the desert. The solitary soul wrenching quiet and starkness has its own beauty. I miss Death Valley sometimes, it is so different here, but I am glad I grew up in southern California and witnessed the changes over the years. Nice photo. Warms my heart.

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  6. That pinkish hue surely does add drama to an already daunting scene, though I'm not sure I trust Markham's reading blood into it. The picture's severity might indeed suggest calamity or grief or a number of other negative things, from the human perspective. But it's also awe-some. I love seeing your shots of these places, all so different of anything I've seen lately--but I can't say they call to me or draw me in or welcome me. A cougar cry of KEEP OUT maybe . . . . And some of your shots, including this one, make me hear and feel the desert wind, which is also not a warmy fuzzy. I want my teddy bear now, please.

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  7. This almost has a 3D feel to it. It reminds me of looking through one of those little old Viewfinders I used to love as a kid.

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  8. Hard to believe that there has been flooding.

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  9. i agree with Banjo52, i can't find any trace of calamity and grief in this landscape, just the awe-inspiring presence of Nature, contained in itself, indifferent to us (though even "indifferent" is a bad word, a word coming from our human world, which can't apply to Nature). but maybe, when thinking historically, back into the darkness of times, these tremendous shapes must have been born through a geological process of such intensity that yes, indeed, we are bound to think of it in terms of violence and calamity...

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  10. A death valley for weaklings (flamboyant shrubbery, pampered humans) but not for rock--it thrives.

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  11. Oops, I think I mistakenly left a comment for this post on another blog over a week ago. So I'll try again. :-) Your photo gives life to this dry and desolate place. What a beautiful rock formation!

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